A multiplanar deformity analysis can be both simple and complex: a correct determination of angular and metric deformity apex and plane is a fundamental task. This is true in both the preoperative surgery planning and the postoperative management phases, in order to obtain the most accurate correction and promote the quickest recovery for the patient’s well-being.

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The initial assessment of any lower extremity deformity is fundamental to plan a successful surgical program of correction, as well as an effective post-operative management of the healing process. The assessment should include the X-rays of full length weight bearing of both legs, with a complete axis evaluation to fix the position of the deformities, which is “the true plane of the deformity”.

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It is known that around 9 per cent of patients with diabetic neuropathy and foot ulcers develop a Charcot foot and ankle. This pathology often goes unrecognized, particularly during the acute phase, until severe complications occur, such as an abnormal pressure distribution on the plantar fascia with bones weakened enough to fracture, followed by a marked foot and ankle deformation and, in the worst cases, by amputation. Thus, today, one of the most crucial questions is how to timely diagnose this condition.

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Although several studies have reported good results of the treatment of the lower extremity deformity combined with shortening – a condition that often means disabling impairment in the daily life activities – to date there are still very few studies that review the evidence by comparing the outcomes of acute versus gradual correction.

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Charcot Foot and Ankle is a significant problem caused by peripheral neuropathy, with an estimated incidence of 0.3 to 7.5% in the diabetic population. This condition, which is also known as Charcot arthropathy, Charcot joint, or neuropathic arthropathy, affects the soft tissues, joints, and bones in the foot and ankle. If left untreated, it may lead to progressive foot deformity, ulceration, or osteomyelitis. In the most advanced stages, it may be necessary to resort to limb amputation.

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Charcot foot and ankle is a severe condition that, if left untreated, may lead to deformity, permanent disability, amputation or ultimately to the patient’s death. People with diabetic neuropathy are at high risk of developing Charcot foot and ankle, because of the decreased sensation and diminished ability to feel temperature, pain or trauma.

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The term CORA (Center of Rotation of Angulation) means a method of mechanical and anatomical axis planning based on joint orientation, which has gained international recognition and acceptance. Many surgeons from all over the world apply this method to limb lengthening and deformity correction, and the CORA principles and concepts have clearly shaped both design and functionality of the last generation of external devices.

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Charcot Foot and Ankle, also known as Charcot arthropathy or Charcot joint, is a condition caused by peripheral neuropathy, leading to the progressive degeneration and destruction of the soft tissue, joint, and bone. In modern society, the most common cause for this neuropathic neuropathy is diabetes mellitus, with long-term diabetic patients having an increased risk of developing the condition.

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